rat poison

Get Deadly Poison Off Store Shelves

Keep our children, pets and wildlife safe from poison.

Keep our children, pets and wildlife safe from poison.

Did you know that anyone can walk into a store and pick up deadly rat poison right off the shelf? And that these poisons often end up accidentally sickening or killing wildlife, pets and even children? The Center for Biological Diversity is asking retailers to pull deadly d-CON products from their shelves. You can help now by taking a step to decrease the likelihood of accidental poisoning of animals and children.

Act Now!

Why It Matters:
Second-generation anticoagulant rodenticides — or “super-toxic” rat poisons — are responsible for more than 10,000 accidental exposures to children and cause unintentional deaths to pets as well as endangered wildlife.  They work by interfering with normal blood clotting and induce a slow, agonizing death by internal bleeding. Endangered San Joaquin kit foxes, golden eagles and Pacific fishers are bleeding to death because of them.

The risks of selling rodenticides to the public outweigh the benefits of using rodenticides in homes, where they can potentially sicken children and kill pets. These poisons travel up the food chain from rodents to larger predators like eagles, hawks, falcons, owls, bobcats, mountain lions, and endangered Pacific fishers and San Joaquin kit foxes. When wildlife feed on poisoned rodents, they themselves become poisoned and often die excruciatingly painful deaths.

A recent excellent article Rat Poisons Threaten Health Of Wildlife, Pets and Kids (Lynne Peeples, Huffington Post) notes that these poisons often end up killing the wild animals that would be doing the rodent control for us, such as birds of prey and coyotes.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is trying to address the problem of accidental poisoning by banning super-toxic poisons and by placing common-sense restrictions on certain dangerous products. The makers of d-CON — one brand of those products — are opposing the agency’s decision in order to continue selling hazardous poisons.

A package of rat poison on the store shelf may seem like a small thing, but its negative impact can be far-reaching.

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